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  • Posts Tagged ‘Ulysses’

    IRELAND/FRANCE: ART, LITERATURE, WINE AT SOTHEBY’S PARIS

    Friday, February 18th, 2022

    Irish delegates, with Eamon de Valera (centre), gather for ‘The World Congress of the Irish Race’, 1922, Paris

    A dedicated cross category sale entitled Ireland / France: Art, Literature, Wine will take place at Sotheby’s Paris on May 16. It will coincide with the cententary of The World Congress of the Irish Race when the newly founded Irish State participated in a week-long international conference in Paris. The aim of the event was to promote an independent Ireland on a world stage and display the country’s artistic and cultural uniqueness. For the occasion, a major, month-long Irish art exhibition of 300 works was also staged at Galeries Barbazanges a bold statement in the art capital of the world.

    Sotheby’s, which is currently seeking consignments for the sale in May, will offer key works by Ireland’s leading artists and writers with French connections or who were represented in the 1922 World Congress. France’s vineyards have also long attracted Irish connoisseurs and the sale will include a select group of lots with Irish links. Ulysses by James Joyce was first published in Paris in December 2020. There will be an online auction from May 9 – 16.

    Sotheby’s is currently seeking works by a variety of artists including August Burke, Harry Clarke, William Conor, Eileen Gray, Rowan Gillespie, Paul Henry, Mainie Jellett, Jack Yeats, William Leech, John Lavery, Countess Markievicz, Roderic O’Conor, Frank O’Meara, Louis le Brocquy, Walter Osborne, Evie Hone, William Scott, Sean Scully, Mary Swanzy, Leo Whelan and the writers James Joyce, J.M. Synge, Oscar Wilde and W B Yeats.

    POCKET WATCH FROM ULYSSES AT BONHAMS PARIS SALE

    Wednesday, October 20th, 2021

    A pocket watch mentioned in Ulysses by James Joyce comes up at Bonhams Time is Precious sale in Paris on November 4. The 18 carat gold hunter case pocket watch and chain was owned by John O’Connell, Superintendent of Glasnevin Cemetary. The reference to O’Connell’s watch comes in Hades, the sixth episode of Ulysses. The novel’s central character Leopold Bloom travels with the funeral procession from Paddy Dignam’s house to Glasnevin cemetery where O’Connell was Superintendent (or caretaker as Joyce calls him). O’Connell regales the small group of mourners with an anecdote, an event described by Joyce as follows: “The caretaker hung his thumbs in the loops of his gold watch chain and spoke in a discreet tone to their vacant smiles.”

    John Kileen O’Connell (1844-1925) was Superintendent of Glasnevin Cemetery, and a well-known and respected Dublin character. In Ulysses, Joyce described him as a ‘portly man’, who “ambushed among the grasses, raised his hat in homage” as the coffin of the deceased Paddy Dignam passed by on a barrow.

    Curator of the Time is Precious sale, James Stratton, said: “This watch has the most fascinating and unusual provenance of any I have ever encountered. To offer a tangible item from one of the most famous and influential novels of modern times is a rare privilege and something I never expect to be able to do again.” The watch is estimated at £50,000-£80,000.

    18ct gold hunter case pocket-watch and chain. UPDATE: THIS WAS UNSOLD

    RARE SIGNED COPY OF ULYSSES MAKES 85,000 ON THE HAMMER

    Tuesday, June 18th, 2019

    A rare first edition of Ulysses signed by James Joyce was the top lot at Fonsie Mealy’s sale in Dublin today. It made 85,000 at hammer in an auction that realised more than 390,000 on the hammer. No less than 85% of lots were sold. Unpublished accounts of the First Dail, described as the financial sinews of the struggle for Irish Independence made 18,000 on the hammer and the Toddy Pierse GAA medal collection relating to Wexford and Dublin between 1918 and 1922 made 12,500. A 1936 French translation of James Joyce’s essay from a banned writer to a banned singer, a tribute to the singer John Sullivan, sold for 9,000.

    (See posts on antiquesandartireland.com for June 15, 10 and 6, 2019).

    A RARE PRIZE AT FONSIE MEALY’S AUCTION

    Thursday, June 6th, 2019

    A first edition of Ulysses, number 30 of 100 copies signed by Joyce and printed on fine Dutch handmade paper, comes up at Fonsie Mealy’s Rare Books, Literature, Manuscripts, Collectibles and Ephemera sale at the Talbot Hotel, Stillorgan, Dublin on June 18. Described by Fonsie Mealy as the cornerstone of any Irish collection copies of this most desireable printing are all but unavailable now. Most of the original copies are securely lodged in institutional and important collections from which they are unlikely to emerge. These copies are from the full edition of 1000 finely bound by Buddenbrooks of Boston in full patinated black morocco with dark green inlays. This rare prize is estimated at 70,000-90,000.

    UPDATE: IT MADE 85,000 AT HAMMER

    THE KEY TO ULYSSES AT SOTHEBY’S BOOK SALE

    Saturday, December 8th, 2018

    The key to the Eccles St. home of Leopold Bloom.  UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR £7,500

    A key created by James Joyce to help his friends keep track of Ulysses comes up at Sotheby’s book sale in London on December 10.  Seven copies were produced in total as the author ever wanted it to be shared too widely. In his words ‘If I give it all up immediately, I’d lose my immortality. I’ve put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant”.  However by 1930 it has been seen so widely that Joyce allowed its publication.  Another lot in the sale is the latchkey to Leopold Bloom’s fictional home at 7 Eccles Street, Dublin. In Ulysses, Bloom’s missing latchkey has been interpreted in Freudian terms as a symbol of his loss of potency, and in political terms as a synecdoche of Irish dispossession before Independence, but given Joyce’s careful mapping of Dublin in the novel it is also a key to a real front door – the home of one of Joyce’s friends. The key was rescued by a Joyce scholar when the house was demolished in the 1960s. The house’s front door was also reclaimed and is now exhibited at Dublin’s James Joyce Centre.

    A little more background on the story of the key in Ulysses – Bloom leaves his latchkey behind in the pocket of yesterday’s trousers when he departs from his home at the beginning of his day’s odyssey. He had reminded himself several times to pick up the key before going out, and his annoyance at his own forgetfulness recurs several times in the novel. Finally, when Bloom staggers home in the early hours of the morning with Stephen Dedalus , he puts his hand in his empty pocket to retrieve his key, so he has to hop the fence and come in by the back door.

    Sotheby’s specialist Gabriel Heaton said: “So our sale has two keys to Ulysses. One is a secret that was never kept but has guided generations of students through the novel; the other once unlocked a front door that now opens onto a brick wall. The very fact that these items still attract such interest shows that Joyce’s immortality is safe enough, and one cannot help but think that Joyce himself would have taken great pleasure in the appearance at auction of his fictional hero’s lost key.”

    The current example is one of three copies of the definitive English schema to precede the novel’s publication, the other two being for the translator Valery Larbaud and the publisher Sylvia Beach.   The online sale runs December 10.

    UPDATE:  The schema sold for £47,500, the key for £7,500.

    BONHAMS TO HOLD VALUATIONS IN WATERFORD

    Friday, October 30th, 2015

    This first edition of Ulysses was sold at Bonhams, they are hoping to find something similar in Waterford.

    This first edition of Ulysses was sold at Bonhams, they are hoping to find something similar in Waterford.

    Specialists from Bonhams will be at the Medieval Museum, Waterford on Thursday November 5 to value paintings, works of art, books and ephemera.  Proceeds of the day will go to the Waterford Treasures Museum conservation fund. Bonhams book specialist Luke Batterham will give a short talk at 11.30am on book collecting and some of the highlights he has discovered during his life as a book specialist.  There will be a question and answer session about the current global art market and the auction world in the afternoon.

    Jane Beattie head of the Bonhams Dublin office commented: ‘Ireland’s oldest city is bound to throw up some remarkable and extraordinary surprise items, we are excited that the Museum invited us to Waterford for this one-off event’.

    SIGNED 1st EDITION OF ULYSSES AT BONHAMS

    Friday, June 5th, 2015

    The first edition of James Joyce's Ulysses at Bonhams.

    The first edition of James Joyce’s Ulysses at Bonhams.

    A signed first edition of  James Joyce’s Ulysses comes up at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts sale in London on June 24. It is part of a large collection of Joyce’s work to be offered.  Ulysses is estimated at £60,000-80,000 and the collection has a combined upper estimate of £300,000.

    The author’s presentation copy printed on hand made paper was given to Lewis Galantiere, an American translator of French literature living in Paris. There he met Joyce and other leading literary figures of the day.  Dated February 11, 1922, this is the earliest known presentation copy apart from the one Joyce gave to his wife Nora on the day of publication, February 2, 1922, the author’s 40th birthday.  Printing was hampered by difficulties over the colour for the cover which Joyce wanted to match the blue of the Greek flag.

    In 1935 Henri Matisse was commissioned to illustrate an edition of Ulysses for subscribers to the Limited Edition Club in America.  Each of the 1,000 copies was signed by Matisse and 250 were also signed by Joyce.  A copy of the book signed by both men is estimated at £6,000-8,000.
    Other works include a first edition of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, (£20,000-30,000); a first edition of Dubliners,  (£3,000-4,000) and a first edition of the very scarce Gas from a Burner (£10,000-15,000) his bitingly satirical poem written in September 1912 about the destruction of 1,000 copies of Dubliners.   A signed copy of the first 1936 English printing of Ulysses, with the cover designed by Eric Gill, is estimated at £10,000-15,000.