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  • Posts Tagged ‘James Joyce’

    THE KEY TO ULYSSES AT SOTHEBY’S BOOK SALE

    Saturday, December 8th, 2018

    The key to the Eccles St. home of Leopold Bloom.  UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR £7,500

    A key created by James Joyce to help his friends keep track of Ulysses comes up at Sotheby’s book sale in London on December 10.  Seven copies were produced in total as the author ever wanted it to be shared too widely. In his words ‘If I give it all up immediately, I’d lose my immortality. I’ve put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant”.  However by 1930 it has been seen so widely that Joyce allowed its publication.  Another lot in the sale is the latchkey to Leopold Bloom’s fictional home at 7 Eccles Street, Dublin. In Ulysses, Bloom’s missing latchkey has been interpreted in Freudian terms as a symbol of his loss of potency, and in political terms as a synecdoche of Irish dispossession before Independence, but given Joyce’s careful mapping of Dublin in the novel it is also a key to a real front door – the home of one of Joyce’s friends. The key was rescued by a Joyce scholar when the house was demolished in the 1960s. The house’s front door was also reclaimed and is now exhibited at Dublin’s James Joyce Centre.

    A little more background on the story of the key in Ulysses – Bloom leaves his latchkey behind in the pocket of yesterday’s trousers when he departs from his home at the beginning of his day’s odyssey. He had reminded himself several times to pick up the key before going out, and his annoyance at his own forgetfulness recurs several times in the novel. Finally, when Bloom staggers home in the early hours of the morning with Stephen Dedalus , he puts his hand in his empty pocket to retrieve his key, so he has to hop the fence and come in by the back door.

    Sotheby’s specialist Gabriel Heaton said: “So our sale has two keys to Ulysses. One is a secret that was never kept but has guided generations of students through the novel; the other once unlocked a front door that now opens onto a brick wall. The very fact that these items still attract such interest shows that Joyce’s immortality is safe enough, and one cannot help but think that Joyce himself would have taken great pleasure in the appearance at auction of his fictional hero’s lost key.”

    The current example is one of three copies of the definitive English schema to precede the novel’s publication, the other two being for the translator Valery Larbaud and the publisher Sylvia Beach.   The online sale runs December 10.

    UPDATE:  The schema sold for £47,500, the key for £7,500.

    JAMES JOYCE’S PINCE NEZ MAKE 17,000 AT FONSIE MEALY SALE

    Tuesday, December 4th, 2018

    An original pair of pince-nez glasses owned by James Joyce sold for a hammer price of 17,000 at Fonsie Mealy’s rare book and memorabilia sale in Dublin today.  The pair, complete with, gilt fittings and chain and in a velvet lined morocco case from a Dublin optician, was from the collection of Joyce’s friend Thomas Pugh.  By tradition these are Joyce’s own glasses used when writing Ulysses. In good condition they are familiar from many photographs, including his passport.

    A letter written to Thomas Pugh by James Joyce in 1934, from the Grand Hotel Britannique, Spa, Belgique made 14,000 at hammer.  In it Joyce requested Pugh to visit him when next in Paris and also asks if Pugh knows of any illustrated weekly published in Dublin around 1904 for the use of Henri Matisse, who was working on designs for a new de luxe edition of Ulysses. (Pugh supplied the illustrations but the illustrations by Matisse are drawn entirely from Greek myth).

    A first edition of Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale, published by Jonathan Cape in 1953, sold for 9,500 at hammer.

    ART AND ANTIQUES AT DOLAN’S LIMERICK AUCTION

    Tuesday, November 20th, 2018

    An art and antiques auction by Dolan’s takes place at Castletroy Park Hotel in Limerick on November 25. Paintings include Endymion, a Dubliner mentioned by James Joyce in Ulysses.  Endymion was the nickname of James Farrell, a Dublin eccentric born in 1851 who worked for a time as an excise officer, reputedly in Guinness. He was injured when he tried to rescue a colleague who had fallen into a brewery vessel. In Dublin lore according to Oliver St. John Gogarty he went ‘natural’ after falling into an empty vat and breathing the fumes. He became eccentric and suffered from delusions. He lived in rented accommodation at various addresses in Dublin, which included boarding houses in Pleasants Street, off Camden Street, on Charlemont Road, Clontarf and Baggot Street, but was harmless and well liked.  The catalogue is online. Here is a small selection:

    Harry Kernoff RHA, Endymion, (2,500 – 3,500 )

    George Campbell, City Blues, Toledo, (8,000 – 10,000)

    Chanel Bag, (1,800-2,400)

    Markey Robinson, Men of the West, (2,000 – 3,000)

     

    AN ILLUSTRATED JOURNEY THROUGH INNER CITY DUBLIN

    Saturday, August 18th, 2018
    Everyone, Everywhere, Everyday is an illustrated journey through inner city Dublin inspired by James Joyce’s Ulysses. Artist Eva Kelly sets out to capture the energy and stream of life of contemporary Dublin by tracing  part of the journey made by Leopold Bloom starting at The Oval pub on Abbey St. and concluding in College St.
    Applying the idea of the flaneur observing city life each scene was drawn and photographed from different perspectives.  From this 12 illustrations were made showing exterior spaces, streets, people, interior view points from a cafe, bus window and various shops.
    The exhibition is on show at the Gallery at the Mill Theatre, Dundrum Town Centre until September 30.

    MAN RAY PHOTOGRAPH OF JAMES JOYCE

    Friday, August 18th, 2017

    James Joyce by Man Ray

    This 1922 photograph of James Joyce by Man Ray comes up at Whyte’s Eclectic Collector sale in Dublin on September 9.  The framed photogravure print is estimated at 700-1,000.

    In other Joyce related material the auction includes a first signed American edition of Ulysses estimated at 1,500-2,000.

    There is a wide range of collectibles on offer.  The sale features historical documents and artefacts, sporting memorabilia including The Fergus Reid Collection of Irish Football Programmes, medals and militaria, edged weapons and firearms, a range of gold and silver coinage and banknotes.

    There are rare books including first editions by Oliver Goldsmith, James Joyce and Flann Ó Briain; early printed maps of Ireland and America; Polar Exploration books and collectibles, antique silverware, vertu and curios.

    JAMES JOYCE MANUSCRIPT TOP’S FONSIE MEALY’S SALE

    Wednesday, May 31st, 2017

    AN ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT PAGE FROM FINNEGAN’S WAKE

    An original manuscript from Finnegan’s Wake was the top lot at Fonsie Mealy’s rare books, literature, manuscripts and sporting collectibles sale in Dublin on May 30.  The opening of the Anna Livia Plurabelle section, 16 pages written in James Joyce’s hand, sold for a hammer price of 27,000 against an estimate of 7,500-10,000.  A 1915 All Ireland hurling final medal won by Laois made 11,000 at hammer over an estimate of 7,000-10,000. The Ned Ryan GAA medal collection made 6,500 but the Louth GAA medal collection awarded to Johnny Brennan with dates from 1905 to 1915 failed to find a buyer.

    An archive of five folders of texts and documents by Brian O’Nolan (Flann O’Brien) sold for 10,000 over a top estimate of 8,000 and the author’s secretaire bookcase, which featured on the front page of the catalogue, sold for 3,400. A rare first edition of At Swim Two Birds made 6,200 and a set of signed copies by Seamus Heaney made 5,600.

    A total of 75% of lots were sold on the hammer and the auction realised 380,000.

    (See post on antiquesandartireland.com for May 25, 2017)

    RARE BOOKS AND SPORTING MEMORABILIA AT FONSIE MEALY’S DUBLIN AUCTION

    Thursday, May 25th, 2017

    Irish, English and international literature, first editions, signed editions, periodicals,  photographs, GAA and other sporting memorabilia will come under the hammer at Fonsie Mealy’s auction at the Tara Towers Hotel in Dublin on May 30. The sale will include an original manuscript page  from Finnegan’s Wake and first editions by James Joyce as well as Mosada, the first work by William Butler Yeats of which only 500 copies were printed. There is a first edition of John le Carre’s The Spy who came in from the Cold and a number of Harry Potter editions signed by J.K. Rowling and the cast of the films.

    Sporting memorabilia includes a Co. Laois first and only All Ireland Hurling Final medal from 1915, a Co. Louth twelve medal collection awarded to Johnny Brennan who retired as a player in 1916, match programmes from the 1930’s to the 1950’s and a ticket to the infamous 1920 Bloody Sunday match at Croke Park.  The catalogue is online. Here is a small selection:

    The Louth GAA Medal collection awarded to Johnny Brennan 1905-1915 (15,000-20,000) UPDATE: THIS WAS UNSOLD

     

    The rugby ball reputed to have been used in 1948 when Ireland beat Wales to claim their first Grand Slam. (700-900)  UPDATE: THIS MADE 500 AT HAMMER

    A first (1938) edition of The Green Fool by Patrick Kavanagh (1,000-1,500)  UPDATE: THIS MADE 1,000 AT HAMMER

    A first edition of Flann O’Brien’s At Swim Two Birds (1,750-2,500)  UPDATE: THIS MADE 6,200 AT HAMMER

    The Tailor of Gloucester (1903) and other early Beatrix Potter editions (600-700)  UPDATE: THIS MADE 500 AT HAMMER

    A silver gilt Cumann na mBan lapel badge by Long, Cork (250-320) UPDATE: THIS MADE 400 AT HAMMER

    All Ireland Hurling Final programme for 1946 (300-400)  UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR 200

    CHAMPION RED SETTER WITH LITERARY ASSOCIATIONS

    Monday, May 1st, 2017

    Garryowen champions collar.  UPDATE: THIS MADE 6,600 AT HAMMER

    Garryowen was far from your average red setter.  The champions collar of an animal who was mentioned in James Joyces’ Ulysses, accorded an obituary in the Chicago Tribune and whose portrait is in the collection of the National Gallery of Ireland, comes up at the eclectic collector sale at Whyte’s on Molesworth St. in Dublin on May 6.  Suspended with engraved medals representing each of his 37 firsts the collar is estimated at 800-1,200.

    Owned by James Giltrap, Joyce’s uncle, Garryowen began winning shows in the 1880’s.  When he won the Grand Prix de Honeur at the Belgian Kennel Club and Limerick tobacco manufacturers the Spillanes named a new tobacco product Garryowen as a “Setter of quality”. Wearing his champions collar Garryowen appeared on enamel signs throughout the country. Three versions of the sign are in the sale with estimate of 150-400.

    JOE BARRETT GAA MEDAL COLLECTION MAKES 40,000

    Thursday, September 29th, 2016
    The Joe Barrett medal collection.

    The Joe Barrett medal collection.

    The Joe Barrett GAA medal collection was the top lot at Fonsie Mealy’s Rare Books and Collectors sale in Kilkenny on September 28.   In 1929 Joe Barrett was the first Kerryman to lift the Sam Maguire trophy and his medal collection sold for a hammer price of 40,000.  It went to a private collector in Kerry.  The Phil Shanahan of Toomevara GAA medal collection went for 19,000.  A facsimile of the Book of Kells made 5,000 and  a Seamus Heaney handwritten foolscap manuscript critique of Celtic Art, an introduction by Ian Finlay made 2,000.  A pamphlet  presented by Heaney to Sean White complete with a three verse poem in Heaney’s own handwriting made 1,700 and an 1840 edition of The Ancient Music of Ireland edited by Bunting made sold for 1,600.

    Stirrings Still by Samuel Beckett, with illustrations by Louis le Brocquy and signed by both sold for 1,500.  A 1935 limited edition of Ulysses by James Joyce with illustrations by Henri Matisse signed by the artist sold for  1,400.

    (See post on antiquesandartireland.com for September 23, 2016)

    BECKETT AND JOYCE – AN EARLY CRITIQUE

    Friday, August 19th, 2016

    beckettA first edition of an early critique by Samuel Beckett with and about James Joyce is available with London rare booksellers Peter Harrington. Published by Shakespeare and Company in 1929 “Our Exagmination Round his Factification for Incamination of Work in Progress” comes with letters of protest by G. V. L. Slingsby and Vladimir Dixon. This is copy 45 of 96 large numbered copies printed on Verge d’Arches. This early critique of Joyce’s final work was published some 10 years prior to the publication of Finnegan’s Wake.  Part of the incentive to publish was apparently to raise funds for the perennially impecunious Joyce. A myth surrounding this work is that one or both of the two letters of protest were written by Joyce himself. However both authors existed – indeed Beach herself commissioned Slingsby. Dixon’s effort was an unsolicited one by a Russian émigré who was to die in Paris in 1929, just as the book was published.

    The critique is priced at £4,750 and is one of a number of plays, novels, essays and inscribed items spanning Beckett’s career now available at Peter Harrington on Dover St. in London.