antiquesandartireland.com

Information about Art, Antiques and Auctions in Ireland and around the world
  • ABOUT
  • About Des
  • Contact
  • Posts Tagged ‘Dix Noonan Webb’

    RARE PLOUGHMAN’S NOTE AT DIX NOONAN WEBB

    Saturday, February 20th, 2021

    A particularly rare Irish £10 Ploughman’s note is estimated at £22,000-£26,000 at Dix Noonan Webb’s live and online auction in London on February 24. The Northern Bank note dated May 6, 1929 is being offered by a private collector at a sale of British, Irish and World Banknotes which features the only known example of a £50 note from the Belfast Banking Company Ltd. This note, dated December 7, 1917, is estimated at £8,000-£10,000.

     Founded in 1783 the Bank of Ireland was the first national bank in this country and a £1 note from its Westport branch dating from 1838 is estimated at £9,000-£11,000. Surviving pre-1850 notes are very rare. 

    UPDATE: The Northern Bank Ploughman’s Note sold for £18,000, the Belfast Banking Co. £50 note sold for £10,000 and the Westport note sold for £9,500.

    Rare Ploughman’s Note from the Northern Bank. UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR £18,000

    MEDAL AWARDED TO BRITISH SOLDIER AT EASTER RISING SELLS IN LONDON

    Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

    A medal awarded to Lieutenant Basil Worswick, killed on April 29, 1916 at the Guinness Brewery in Dublin during the height of the Easter Rising sold for £1,300 at Dix Noonan Webb  in London today. He was shot by a guard, who thought he was a Sinn Fein spy.   The 1914-15 Star plus was expected to fetch £400-500. Worswick went with the 2nd Battalion to Ireland to help quell the disturbance in the Dublin. On the night of April 28/29 a detachment of the Dublin Fusiliers was stationed at the malt house. When the night clerk of the brewery, accompanied by Lieutenant Lucas of the King Edward’s Horse, was making his nightly round he was challenged by the very nervous guard of Royal Dubliners. Mistaken for Sinn Feiners trying to infiltrate the brewery premises, the guard shot both the night clerk and Lucas dead. Worswick heard the commotion. He arrived at the malt house to find that his fellow officer had been killed. Challenged and searched by a sergeant of the Dublin Fusiliers he rushed at him. Seeing this the guard believing Worswick to be a Sinn Fein spy, killed him instantly.

    The Company Quartermaster Sergeant in charge of the party of Dublin Fusiliers, Robert Flood, was court-martialled and acquitted for the deaths of Lieutenants Lucas and Worswick. His actions were attributed to the confusion and panic of the Easter Rising. He died in action in Macedonia the following year.

    GEORGE BEST £5 NOTE PROOFS AT DIX NOONAN WEBB

    Thursday, February 11th, 2021

    The die proofs for the Ulster Bank Limited’s George Best commemorative £5 dating from November 25, 2006 will come up online at Dix Noonan Webb‘s sale of British, Irish and World Banknotes in London on February 24. The note itself was sold commercially in numbered folders and remains the most popular commemorative banknote ever produced in the UK. The die proofs featuring Best represent part of the design process for the final note. They are estimated at £400-500. UPDATE: THESE SOLD FOR £360

    WORLD RECORD PRICE FOR CROMWELL COIN

    Friday, January 22nd, 2021

    There was a world record for a rare Oliver Cromwell 50 shilling coin, dating from 1656 at Dix Noonan Webb in London on January 21. The gold coin sold for £471,200 over a top estimate of £150,000. There were bidders on the phone and the internet from the Far East, North America and the UK. The piece, struck by Thomas Simon, Cromwell’s chief engraver, went to an American buyer.

    Another highlight was a rare and fine silver Commonwealth Shilling by Irishman David Ramage. Once in the collection of the Duke of Devonshire, the shilling is decorated with a small shield of England and sold for £74,400 against an estimate of £15,000-20,000. It went to a UK Collector. David Ramage was Simon’s competitor and fell out of favour with Cromwell but had the monopoly on the production of 17th trade tokens.

    The Cromwell 50 shilling gold coin, dating from 1656, by Thomas Simon,

    RARE IRISH PROOF COIN AT DIX NOONAN WEBB

    Sunday, January 17th, 2021

    An extremely rare Irish Proof or Pattern Halfpenny  is one of a number of valuable Irish coins coming up at Dix Noonan Webb in London.  Bought for the equivalent of $2 many years ago it will be offered at a live/online auction of Coins and Historical Medals on on February 2.   It is from the collection of the late Eric Newman,  an important numismatist from the US. The George III halfpenny dates to 1774.  Complete with a portrait of the long haired king and with a harp on the reverse it is estimated at £2,400-3,000. An Irish George III pattern mule penny from 1813, one of only three specimens known, is estimated at £6,000-8,000.

    Irish Proof or Pattern Halfpenny UPDATE: THE HALFPENNY (ILLUSTRATED) SOLD FOR £3,000, THE GEORGE III PATTERN MULE PENNY FROM 1813 MADE £4,400

    ARCHIVE AIB MATERIAL MAKES £122,815 FOR CHARITY

    Friday, October 30th, 2020

    A collection of archive material from AIB (formerly First Trust Bank) made £122,815 at Dix Noonan Webb in aid of charity. The archival material offered a wide range of proofs, specimens, sheets and issued notes dating from 1954 to 2012 from the Provincial Bank through to AIB and First Trust Bank. All lots had been offered in three sales over the past seven months and the proceeds will be split between Age NI and the Alzheimer’s Society.

    With buyers from all over the world the 330 lots were 100% sold. The top lot – a booklet containing an official De Le Rue proposal for a polymer £10 ‘2017 New Series’, featuring two completely different proposed designs, that were never adopted fetched £8,500 – 14 times it’s pre-sale estimate of £400-600. It went to a private buyer.

    (See post on antiquesandartireland.com for March 7, 2020)

    A booklet with the De La Rue proposal for a polymer £10 note.

    DARING DAYLIGHT HEIST RECALLED AT LONDON AUCTION

    Saturday, June 13th, 2020

    The daring heist that was Britain’s biggest robbery is recalled in the sale of a rare £1 million Treasury Bill at Dix Noonan Webb in London on June 24  A knifepoint mugging in broad daylight resulted in the theft of a staggering £292 million in treasury bills. Bought by financial institutions at less than face value and sold back to the government on maturity the secretive system of treasury bills enables the British government to manage short term borrowing. Bills collected by messenger from the Bank of England could be cashed in by whoever held them.

    On May 2, 1990 John Goddard, a 58 year-old messenger with money brokers Sheppards, was mugged by a thief who got away with 301 treasury bills and certificates of deposit. Only the $1 billion theft from the Central Bank of Iraq by one of Saddam Hussein’s sons in 2003 has exceeded this robbery.

    City of London Police and the FBI infiltrated the gang involved in laundering the bills and eventually recovered all but two of them. One man was jailed for his part but Patrick Thomas, the petty criminal from south London believed to have carried out the mugging, was found dead from a gunshot wound to the head before he could be charged.
    The system is in place today but it is computerised.  The last bills were produced in September 2003 and one of these comes up at the live online auction by Dix Noonan Webb. Effectively a one million pound note it is on watermarked paper bearing the signature of Andrew Turnbull, then Permanent Secretary to the Treasury, and stamped cancelled. It is estimated at £5,000-7,000. The auction will feature 188 Irish banknotes including a rare Munster and Leinster Bank £10 Ploughman’s Note from December 5, 1931 (£2,400-3,000) and a £50 Central Bank of Ireland note from May 1943 (£3,400-4,000).

    UPDATE: THE Treasury Bill sold for £4,400

    WORLD RECORD FOR NORTHERN IRISH PENNY

    Wednesday, May 27th, 2020

    A rare penny struck in Northern Ireland in the 17th Century made a world auction record price of £6,200 in an online sale at Dix Noonan Webb in London on May 26. The Andrew Willoughby penny from Carrickfergus in Co. Antrim was expected to fetch £240-300. The record price for a 17th century British trade token was paid by a collector in the US. It is in very fine condition. The underbidder was from the UK. Dix Noonan Webb will donate 5% of their buyers premium to NHS Charities Together. A total of £24,879 has donated to the charity from the auctions since the lockdown due to COVID-19.

    The rare Northern Ireland penny

    IRISH BANKNOTES AT UK AUCTION

    Saturday, March 7th, 2020

    The words “Charity” and “Bank” are hardly synonymous but the first sale devoted entirely to Irish banknotes by UK specialist auctioneers Dix Noonan Webb in London on March 12 will include 120 lots from the archive of AIB (formerly the First Trust Bank) to be sold in aid of charity.  There are around 200 other lots from various other sources. The archive includes proofs, specimens and high grade issued notes from the Provincial Bank, AIB and First Trust Bank. Among the most prized lots are four uncut sheets of 35 First Trust Bank £10 proofs from the 1994-96 issue estimated at £2,000-2,600 and three uncut sheets of 24 First Trust £100 dating from March 1, 1996 (£1,500-2,000). 

    Adrian Moynihan, Head of AIB (NI) said: “With a long and proud history of supporting the Northern Ireland community, AIB is delighted to bring forward for auction its banknote archive in the hope and anticipation that it will raise significant money for two local charities.” Proceeds will be split between Age Northern Ireland and the Alzheimer’s Society.

    Prime lots from other sources include a rare and attractive high denomination Bank of Ireland £20, dating from November 1915, which is expected to make £3,000-£3,600.  The auction will be preceded on March 11 by A sale of Irish Coins and Medals at Dix Noonan Webb which includes an extremely rare Free State (1921-1937) Proof Florin from 1934.

    Provincial Bank of Ireland £5 note proofs. UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR £900

    MEDAL AWARDED TO BARON VENTRY’S SON AT LONDON AUCTION

    Wednesday, February 26th, 2020

    The Small Army Gold Medal for Orthes 1814 awarded to Major the Hon. Edward Mullens, 28th Foot comes up at Dix Noonan Webb in London on March 5. Mullens was the fifth son of Sir Thomas Mullens, 1st Baron Ventry. Frederick William Mullens (d. 1712), an English Colonel who claimed descent from the Norman de Moleyns, established this branch of the family in Co. Kerry, settling at Burnham House near Dingle around 1666. His great-grandson, Sir Thomas Mullens (1736-1824), one of three major electoral patrons in Kerry, was created Baron Ventry in the Irish peerage on July 31, 1800, as a reward for his family’s support for the Union with Britain and the abolition of the Irish Parliament.

    In the Napoleonic Wars Edward Mullens fought in fifteen battles in the Peninsula between 1809 and 1814, commanded a Light Battalion at Orthes, and was one of the heroes of the Battle of Barossa. At the battle of Orthes on February 27, 1814, Mullens commanded a brigaded battalion made up of all the Light Companies of Colonel O’Callaghan’s Brigade, those of the 28th, 34th, and 39th Foot, plus a Company of 5th Battalion 60th Rifles. His mission, successfully accomplished, was to seize and hold the ford over the Gave de Pau river at Souars.

    His Field Officer’s Gold Medal is fitted with three-pronged gold ribbon bar together with a fine colour portrait miniature of the recipient on ivory, in a silver-gilt and gilt metal glazed oval frame, the reverse engraved ‘Major The Honble Edward Mullens. 28th Regt.’  It is estimated at £18,000-22,000.

    UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR £16,0O0