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  • Posts Tagged ‘Dix Noonan Webb’

    DUBLIN COPPER TOKEN MAKES £1,860 AT DIX NOONAN WEBB

    Monday, October 4th, 2021

    This Dublin copper token made £1,860 against an estimate of £40-60 at Dix Noonan Webb’s sale of tokens, tickets and passes in London. It was one of a number of Irish tokens from the Collection of Barry Woodside. The 63 lots had a pre-sale estimate of £7,000 and achieved a total of £27,361. It was 100% sold. The highest price was for this token depicting a horse and jockey and stamped James Large. He is believed to have been the inn holder at the Horse and Jockey, 26 Lincoln Place in 1855.  It was bought by a private collector in the Irish Republic. 

    COMMUNION TOKENS FROM IRELAND AT DIX NOONAN WEBB

    Sunday, July 4th, 2021

    A collection of Communion tokens,  derived from the Irish wars of religion of the mid 1600’s, comes up at a sale of Coins, Tokens and Historical Medals at Dix Noonan Webb in London on July 6 and 7. Amassed over many years by Delmas Parker, an American, the collection comprises 72 lots, totalling 455 pieces, mostly from the northern counties like Antrim, Down and Derry. Most of the towns and villages in Northern Ireland are represented in the collection. Protestants assembled in large church meetings, which served, not just as religious meetings, but also as political gatherings. To keep track of just who was attending these larger meetings, which were subject to activities of political spies and people that did not belong, communion tokens came into being. They were given to known local congregants by the priest or pastor. The tokens would be surrendered at the larger church meetings. They acted as passes, allowing members from smaller congregations to assemble in larger churches and not be deemed political spies or unrepentant sinners.

    Lot 1075 is a collection of communion tokens from Co. Antrim. UPDATE: THESE MADE £240 AT HAMMER

    RARE IRISH £100 NOTE AT LONDON AUCTION

    Thursday, May 20th, 2021

    A rare Irish £100 note from 1928 comes up at Dix Noonan Webb in London on May 27. Among a strong selection of Irish notes in the auction of British, Irish and World banknotes is this £100 note from the Irish Free State, dated 10 September 1928 and estimated at £12,000-16,000. A £50 note from the same date carries an estimate of £8,000-10,000. (Update – the £100 note sold for £14,880, the £50 note went for £9,920).

    Andrew Pattison, Head of Department at Dix Noonan Webb, said: “These two notes are some of the first issued by the independent Ireland in 1928, and are also the first to feature the iconic image of Lady Lavery leaning on harp.  There are now thought to be less than ten of each of these denominations still in existence from this early date.” 

    UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR £14,880 TO A COLLECTOR IN IRELAND

    WORLD RECORD FOR UNOFFICIAL IRISH FARTHING

    Tuesday, May 11th, 2021

    A rare copper token – an unofficial Irish farthing – engraved James Mabbs, Albion Bakery, 27 Patrick Street, Cork sold to an Irish collector for a world record price of £2,976 at Dix Noonan Webb in London this month. Lot 835 in the sale of Coins, Tokens and Historical Medals had been estimated at £300-400. The copper token dates to 1840-1870. It was from the Irish token collection of the late Barry Woodside, who was born in Belfast. His collection, which comprised 40 lots, sold for a total of £20,795. It included three tokens from Belfast which made £4,464.

    Also in the sale was the the second part of the collection of 17th century tokens formed by the late Robert Thompson. This saw the highest price paid for a lot comprising two civic tokens from Limerick including a very fine example of a City Farthing dating from 1658 . It went to a US buyer for £1,612 against an estimate of £90-120.

    EARLIEST KNOWN PORTRAIT OF KING GEORGE II

    Friday, April 9th, 2021

    THIS gold medal from an old Irish collection showing the earliest known portrait of Georg August, Electoral Prince of Brunswick-Calenburg-Hanover, who would later become King George II, sold for £6,820 at Dix Noonan Webb in London this week. Dating from 1701, the year of his 18th birthday, the medal shows the Prince, who was the last British monarch born outside England, on one side and Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover on the other. It went to a buyer in Holland.

    RARE PLOUGHMAN’S NOTE AT DIX NOONAN WEBB

    Saturday, February 20th, 2021

    A particularly rare Irish £10 Ploughman’s note is estimated at £22,000-£26,000 at Dix Noonan Webb’s live and online auction in London on February 24. The Northern Bank note dated May 6, 1929 is being offered by a private collector at a sale of British, Irish and World Banknotes which features the only known example of a £50 note from the Belfast Banking Company Ltd. This note, dated December 7, 1917, is estimated at £8,000-£10,000.

     Founded in 1783 the Bank of Ireland was the first national bank in this country and a £1 note from its Westport branch dating from 1838 is estimated at £9,000-£11,000. Surviving pre-1850 notes are very rare. 

    UPDATE: The Northern Bank Ploughman’s Note sold for £18,000, the Belfast Banking Co. £50 note sold for £10,000 and the Westport note sold for £9,500.

    Rare Ploughman’s Note from the Northern Bank. UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR £18,000

    MEDAL AWARDED TO BRITISH SOLDIER AT EASTER RISING SELLS IN LONDON

    Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

    A medal awarded to Lieutenant Basil Worswick, killed on April 29, 1916 at the Guinness Brewery in Dublin during the height of the Easter Rising sold for £1,300 at Dix Noonan Webb  in London today. He was shot by a guard, who thought he was a Sinn Fein spy.   The 1914-15 Star plus was expected to fetch £400-500. Worswick went with the 2nd Battalion to Ireland to help quell the disturbance in the Dublin. On the night of April 28/29 a detachment of the Dublin Fusiliers was stationed at the malt house. When the night clerk of the brewery, accompanied by Lieutenant Lucas of the King Edward’s Horse, was making his nightly round he was challenged by the very nervous guard of Royal Dubliners. Mistaken for Sinn Feiners trying to infiltrate the brewery premises, the guard shot both the night clerk and Lucas dead. Worswick heard the commotion. He arrived at the malt house to find that his fellow officer had been killed. Challenged and searched by a sergeant of the Dublin Fusiliers he rushed at him. Seeing this the guard believing Worswick to be a Sinn Fein spy, killed him instantly.

    The Company Quartermaster Sergeant in charge of the party of Dublin Fusiliers, Robert Flood, was court-martialled and acquitted for the deaths of Lieutenants Lucas and Worswick. His actions were attributed to the confusion and panic of the Easter Rising. He died in action in Macedonia the following year.

    GEORGE BEST £5 NOTE PROOFS AT DIX NOONAN WEBB

    Thursday, February 11th, 2021

    The die proofs for the Ulster Bank Limited’s George Best commemorative £5 dating from November 25, 2006 will come up online at Dix Noonan Webb‘s sale of British, Irish and World Banknotes in London on February 24. The note itself was sold commercially in numbered folders and remains the most popular commemorative banknote ever produced in the UK. The die proofs featuring Best represent part of the design process for the final note. They are estimated at £400-500. UPDATE: THESE SOLD FOR £360

    WORLD RECORD PRICE FOR CROMWELL COIN

    Friday, January 22nd, 2021

    There was a world record for a rare Oliver Cromwell 50 shilling coin, dating from 1656 at Dix Noonan Webb in London on January 21. The gold coin sold for £471,200 over a top estimate of £150,000. There were bidders on the phone and the internet from the Far East, North America and the UK. The piece, struck by Thomas Simon, Cromwell’s chief engraver, went to an American buyer.

    Another highlight was a rare and fine silver Commonwealth Shilling by Irishman David Ramage. Once in the collection of the Duke of Devonshire, the shilling is decorated with a small shield of England and sold for £74,400 against an estimate of £15,000-20,000. It went to a UK Collector. David Ramage was Simon’s competitor and fell out of favour with Cromwell but had the monopoly on the production of 17th trade tokens.

    The Cromwell 50 shilling gold coin, dating from 1656, by Thomas Simon,

    RARE IRISH PROOF COIN AT DIX NOONAN WEBB

    Sunday, January 17th, 2021

    An extremely rare Irish Proof or Pattern Halfpenny  is one of a number of valuable Irish coins coming up at Dix Noonan Webb in London.  Bought for the equivalent of $2 many years ago it will be offered at a live/online auction of Coins and Historical Medals on on February 2.   It is from the collection of the late Eric Newman,  an important numismatist from the US. The George III halfpenny dates to 1774.  Complete with a portrait of the long haired king and with a harp on the reverse it is estimated at £2,400-3,000. An Irish George III pattern mule penny from 1813, one of only three specimens known, is estimated at £6,000-8,000.

    Irish Proof or Pattern Halfpenny UPDATE: THE HALFPENNY (ILLUSTRATED) SOLD FOR £3,000, THE GEORGE III PATTERN MULE PENNY FROM 1813 MADE £4,400