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  • Posts Tagged ‘U2’

    ICONS AND IDOLS: ROCK-N-ROLL AT JULIEN’S AUCTION

    Friday, October 26th, 2018

    Bob Dylan’s Fender Telecaster 1952 reissue, Michael Jackson’s Bad Jacket and Bono’s Irish Falcon Gretsch

    Signature guitars from U2, Edge’s 1976 Gibson Explorer electric guitar and two of Bono’s Gretsch guitars – a green Irish Falcon stage and a black Falcon electric guitar – will feature at Julien’s Auctions on November 10.  Julien’s will offer property from the collection of philanthropist and businessman Milton Verret – founder of First National Reserve, First Fidelity Reserve and U.S. Money Reserve, three of the largest gold and silver firms in America – as part of the Icons and Idols Rock n Roll live and online sales over four sessions on November 9 and 10.

    Verret’s collection is to be sold in a philanthropic partnership with MusiCares®, a charity of the Recording Academy™ that provides a wide range of health and human services resources to music people in need.

    Nearly 100 items from Verret’s world renowned collection of some of the most important pieces of rock–n–roll memorabilia will come under the hammer. The all star lineup features historical items from music legends, Prince, Madonna, Jimi Hendrix, Elvis Presley, The Beatles, Bernie Taupin, Aretha Franklin and others.  The venue for the sales is the Hard Rock Cafe, Times Square, New York.

    UPDATE:  Dylan’s Fender Telecaster sold for $76,800, Michael Jackson’s Bad Jacket sold for $298,000 and Bono’s Irish Falcon Gretsch sold for $64,000.

    YOU TOO CAN HAVE A SLICE OF THE ACTION

    Monday, February 5th, 2018
    In Sixmilebridge, Co. Clare Aidan Foley’s sale on February 13 will include around 200 lots from the former Principle Management Building on Sir John Rogerson’s Quay, the music and management company founded by Paul McGuinness who successfully managed U2 for more than 30 years to 2013.

    Among these are some good desks, leather couches, chair, lamps and luxurious office accoutrements.  The auction includes lots from a period house in Askeaton with six Victorian gilt overmantles, a Victorian oval ended dining table  with two extra leaves estimated at just 300-400 and chairs.  There will be over 1,000 lots.

    A boardroom table from Principle Management  UPDATE:  The table made 759

    A Victorian overmantle mirror  UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR 480

    ADAM CLAYTON’S BASQUIAT AT CHRISTIE’S

    Friday, February 10th, 2017

    Jean-Michel Basquiat Untitled (1982) UPDATE: THIS MADE £2,225,000

    Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Untitled (1982) from the collection of U2’s bassist Adam Clayton is to be a major highlight of Christie’s Post-War and Contemporary Art evening auction in London on March 7. Held for over twenty-five years in Clayton’s collection, Untitled featured on the front cover of the catalogue for the exhibition Basquiat Drawings held in 1990 at The Robert Miller Gallery in New York.  A deeply poignant self-portrait, the work offers a rare insight into Basquiat’s psyche at a pivotal moment in his career: a tear drops from his eye; his arms seem to pierce his body like an arrow. Basquiat depicts himself as a martyr: a Saint Sebastian-like figure for the contemporary age.  It is estimated at £1-1.5 million.

    Adam Clayton: “There was a group of them – there was Basquiat, there was Keith Haring, and obviously Warhol was the granddaddy of the whole movement. The idea that these young painters without any gallery experience could make their mark on the streets of New York – could go to the hippest night clubs, could mix with musical culture – was very exciting to me. It was where I came from – I always thought music and art went hand in hand together.”

    Francis Outred, Chairman and Head of Post-War and Contemporary Art EMERI: “On the occasion of the 30th anniversary of U2’s Joshua Tree, an album which was a thorough exploration of the band’s political and spiritual relationship with the United States, it is a rare privilege to showcase this work which Adam Clayton acquired during his first months of moving to New York.  Unlike other self-portraits by Basquiat it articulates his fragility as a figure who is coming to terms with his new position in the world and injects the deepest pathos into the narrative of his dramatic trajectory from anonymous graffiti artist to international art superstar.”