antiquesandartireland.com

Information about Art, Antiques and Auctions in Ireland and around the world
  • ABOUT
  • About Des
  • Contact
  • Archive for February, 2019

    ROMEO AND JULIET BY YEATS AT BONHAMS

    Friday, February 8th, 2019

    Romeo and Juliet (The Last Act) by Jack Butler Yeats.

    Romeo and Juliet (The Last Act), by Jack Butler Yeats is to be a highlight of Bonhams Modern British and Irish art sale in London on June 12.  Painted in 1927, the much-exhibited work depicts the ending to the play in the Capulet family mausoleum. Waking from a drugged coma, Juliet finds the lifeless body of Romeo, who had committed suicide believing his wife to be dead. Stricken with grief, Juliet takes her own life. Yeats shows the bodies of the star-crossed lovers slumped at the foot of the tomb. It is not known whether the artist imagined the scene, or based it on a production of the play that he had attended.

    Bonhams Director of Modern British and Irish Art Penny Day said, “With Valentine’s Day fast approaching there could not be a better time to announce the sale of Jack Yeat’s magical depiction of the world’s two most famous fictional lovers. The painting wonderfully captures the atmosphere in the theatre as the play reaches its tragic conclusion.”  It is estimated at €90,000-135,000.

    The sale also includes Romeo and Juliet (After Adelaide Claxton) by Walter Sickert estimated at €17,000-23,000.

    UPDATE: THE YEATS SOLD FOR £62,562 ON JULY 1, 2020

    ARNOTT’S 1931 BENTLEY AT BONHAMS PARIS AUCTION

    Wednesday, February 6th, 2019

    THE 1931 BENTLEY  UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR 787,850

    This 1931 Bentley 8-Litre Sports Tourer, which previously belonged to Sir John Alexander Arnott the former chairman of the Irish Times, comes up at Bonhams auction of Les Grandes Marques du Monde at The Grand Palais in Paris on February 7.  It is lot 232 and estimated at 600,000-800,000.

    Arnott’s father, Sir John Arnott, first baronet, was the founder of Arnotts department store chain. He was a major figure in the commercial and political spheres of late-19th century Cork. In 1873 he purchased the Irish Times for £35,000 from the widow of its founder, Major Laurence Knox. John Alexander Arnott, second baronet, became managing director and chairman of the Irish Times in 1900.  He held these positions until his death in 1940. Arnott’s ownership of the 1931 Bentley is thought to date from March 31, 1937, when a continuation logbook was issued for the vehicle. The original owner, James C Clark, was a US cotton millionaire and keen sportsman from New Jersey. Judging from the logbook, the vehicle was unlicensed and hence unused between December 31, 1939 and August 15, 1956 when it was re-licensed by new owner James Robert William Murland in County Down.

    NEW WORLD RECORD FOR DURER WOODCUT AT CHRISTIE’S

    Monday, February 4th, 2019

    Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528) The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse

    There was a new world record for a woodcut from Albrecht Durer’s Apocalypse series at Christie’s in New York.  Durer’s The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse made $612,500 against a high estimate of $350,000.  It was the top lot at Christie’s Old Master Prints sale which realised $4.89 million.

    Other great results were achieved for Saint Jerome reading in an Italian Landscape by Rembrandt ($468,500) and Martin Schongauer’s The Death of the Virgin from The Collections of Herschel V. And Carl W. Jones, Minneapolis which achieved $492,500, setting a new record price for the artist. 

    Further artist records were set for the Master E.S., whose Madonna of Einsiedeln: Large Version, also from the Jones collection, achieved $372,500, and Israhel van Meckenem’s Bust of an Oriental Man, which sold for $81,250. Another record was achieved for a print by Jean-Etienne Liotard, whose Large Self-Portrait sold for $75,000.

     The auction was sold 76% by lot and 93% by value.

    SLEDGE FROM SHACKLETON ANTARTIC EXPEDITION AT BONHAMS

    Saturday, February 2nd, 2019

    The sledge  UPDATE: THIS SOLD FOR £163,718

    A sledge from the first expedition to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton is the top lot in Bonhams Travel and Exploration Sale in London on February 6.  Writing about Shackleton in the current edition of Bonhams Magazine, the writer and campaigner Rosie Boycott recalled his status as a great British hero, “He became famous for making a journey so dangerous that even today, with modern high-tech kit, no one would repeat it. And, because his men loved him and trusted him to a fault, he was able to step from the mountains of South Georgia, not just into legend, but into the ranks of superhero whose name would forever be associated with the highest qualities of leadership, ones that seminars have laboured to teach students ever since.”

    Born in Kilkea, County Kildare in 1874, Ernest Shackleton was a major figure in the history of Antarctic exploration. He was a member of Captain Scott’s Discovery Expedition in 1901-1904, before leading his own British Antarctic (Nimrod) Expedition in 1907-09. The sledge in the sale was used on the Nimrod expedition by Eric Marshall – one of the four men, with Shackleton, Jameson Adams, and Frank Wild, to undertake the sledge march to the South Pole. Although they had to abandon the attempt, they reached within 100 geographical miles of the Pole – at the time, the furthest south ever travelled.  It is estimated at £60,000-100,000.

    The four men of the Southern Party were accompanied on their journey by four ponies, each pulling an eleven-foot sledge. During the march, the ponies gradually succumbed to the conditions; three had to be humanely killed, and the last fell into a deep crevasse nearly taking the supplies and Frank Wild with it. Two of the four sledges were left where the first two ponies had been put down, as depots for the return journey. The two remaining sledges went further south.

    THE HEART OF SPACE AT CHRISTIE’S ONLINE METEORITE SALE

    Friday, February 1st, 2019

    The Heart of Space meteorite.

    The Heart of Space, an iconic iron meteorite in the shape of a heart, will highlight Christie’s fifth annual online auction of meteorites.  It will run from February 6 to 14.  The Heart of Space originates from one of the biggest meteorite showers of the last several thousand years, which occurred in Siberia on February 12, 1947.

    The shockwaves from the explosion collapsed chimneys, shattered windows and uprooted trees; sonic booms were heard nearly 200 miles away and eyewitnesses thought the world was ending. Among the meteorites to land on Earth that day was a natural sculptural form from outer space in the shape of a heart. It’s the result of unlikely yet fortuitous cleavage along its crystalline planes as it burned through Earth’s atmosphere — a fiery plunge that thumb-printed the surface and evokes the texture of a Giacometti. It is estimated at $300,000 – $500,000.  There are 45 lots in the sale.