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antiquesandartireland.com

Information about Art, Antiques and Auctions in Ireland and around the world

Posts Tagged ‘Whyte’s’

THE OLD FENIAN JOHN O’LEARY AT WHYTE’S IRISH ART SALE

Saturday, October 8th, 2011

The Old Fenian John O'Leary. (Click on image to enlarge). UPDATE: IT SOLD FOR 2,600.

 

This 19th century Irish School portrait of  The Old Fenian John O’Leary (1830-1907) is at Whyte’s Irish art sale in Dublin on Monday, October 10.  O’Leary, who studied both law and medicine, was imprisoned in England during the 19th century for his involvement with the Irish Republican Brotherhood.  The work is estimated at 1,500-2,000.

In his poem “September 1913″ W.B. Yeats laments the death of O’Leary with the line:

"Romantic Ireland's dead and gone;
it's with O'Leary in the grave".
See antiquesandartireland.com post for October 3.

PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS AND SCULPTURE AT WHYTE’S IRISH ART SALE

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

In Dublin Whyte’s will offer a selection of 279 modern, contempory and classical paintings, drawings and sculpture with realistic market reserves on Monday October 10.  There is a classical Yeats from 1949, a collection of fifteen works by Markey Robinson, ten by Joseph William Carey, five by Hughie O’Donoghue and even a collection of paintings relating to the visit of Queen Elizabeth 11 to Ireland in May 2011.

Here is a selection from the sale:  UPDATE: THE YEATS WAS THE TOP LOT IN A SALE WHICH GROSSED OVER 700,000.

RESCUE MEN, 1949 by Jack Butler Yeats (60,000-80,000). Click on image to enlarge. UPDATE: THIS MADE 110,000.

THE THIRD DAY, c.1950 by Nevill Johnson (8,000-10,000). Click on image to enlarge. UPDATE: THIS WAS UNSOLD.

SIX MILE WATER by Basil Blackshaw (8,000-10,000). Click to enlarge. UPDATE: THIS MADE 7,500

LANCASTRIA II, 2000 by Hughie O'Donoghue (6,000-8,000). Click to enlarge. UPDATE: THIS WAS UNSOLD.

VINCENT IT CAN BE THIS, 1984 by Brian Maguire (800-1,000). Click on image to enlarge. UPDATE: THIS MADE 850.

Ruth by Daniel O'Neill (25,000-35,000). Click on image to enlarge. UPDATE: THIS MADE 37,000.

HISTORY, LITERATURE AND COLLECTIBLES AT WHYTE’S IN DUBLIN

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

More than 700 lots will come under the hammer at Whyte’s History, Literature and Collectibles sale in Dublin on September 24. There are historic artefacts, manuscripts, rare books, posters, militaria and sports memorabilia.  Among the more unusual items is an Irish round tower made with matchsticks by Martin McGuinness, now Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland, when he was a Republican prisoner at Portlaoise in 1974.

There are copies of The Hostage (300-400) and The Borstal Boy (1,200-1,500) signed and inscribed by Brendan Behan and more than 140 lots of Irish coins and banknotes.

The entire catalogue is on-line.  Here is a sample of what is on offer:

A 1914 All Ireland football final Kerry v Wexford programme. The match was a draw, Kerry won the replay. The referee was Harry Boland, subsequently killed in the Irish Civil War. (1,000-1,500). Click to enlarge. UPDATE: THIS MADE 1,500

1794: John Rocque map of the Kingdom of Ireland (estimate 500-700). (Click on image to enlarge). UPDATE: THIS MADE 800

An Irish round tower made by Martin McGuinness, now Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland, while a prisoner in Portlaoise in 1974. On a wooden base inscribed "To Fr. Jimmy from Martin Portlaoise Jail 1974". Martin McGuinness spent time in Portlaoise Prison after he was convicted of being a member of the I.R.A. in February 1974 by the Special Criminal Court in Dublin. It is estimated at 1,000-1,500. UPDATE: MARTIN MCGUINNESS IS NOW A CANDIDATE IN THE IRISH PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION WHICH WILL BE HELD ON OCTOBER 27. UPDATE 2: This made 6,200.

 

IRISH ART SEASON BRINGS IN 6 MILLION AND A TALE OF THREE HENRY’S

Thursday, June 2nd, 2011
The value of Irish art which has changed hands in the current season of sales amounts to around 6 million euro.  James Adam brought in around 1.1 million on June 1, Whyte’s and de Veres brought in 700,000 and 400,000 respectively in May, the Irish artists at Christie’s sale of British and Irish art on May 26 (including Sir John Lavery and William Scott) accounted for another 1.3 million euro and Sotheby’s annual Irish sale at the end of March brought in 2.1 million euro.  These bigger players achieved around 5.6 million.
To this total must be added the achievements of smaller auction houses like Morgan O’Driscoll and Dolans which hold dedicated art sales and tend to deal in names that are less stellar.   In addition Irish art is a latter day mainstay of antique auctions around the country and features to a greater or lesser extent at most sales. All this increases the overall total. The six million euro figure is probably slightly conservative.

Christie's

Whyte's

Adams

These not dissimilar West of Ireland landscapes by Paul Henry boosted results at Christie’s, Whytes and Adams where they sold for £79,250, 106,000 euro and 110,000 euro respectively.
Christie’s sold the single most expensive Irish artwork to change hands at auction thus far in 2011 when they achieved £657,250  for Sir John Lavery’s Played!!  Sotheby’s achieved the highest total for any Irish sale over the past two years.  Roderic O’Conor’s Landscape, Cassis was the top lot at Sotheby’s where it made £337,250.
This website will make two comments on these results. The first is that these totals are highly respectable given that Ireland continues to be in deep recession.  The second is that the Irish art market urgently needs to find new ways of promoting in the salesrooms more contemporary Irish art. The best of Paul Henry, along with Yeats, Orpen, Lavery, O’Conor, Osborne , le Brocquy et all, is highly bankable, especially in recession.  But these are not the only Irish artists who deserve an outlet in the salesrooms. There is no shortage in Ireland of available quality work by contemporary artists. Many more are waiting in the wings for the recognition that is properly their due. The focus of the Irish art market is too narrow. This problem needs to be addressed by everyone involved in the art market in an effective way if stagnation is to be avoided in the salesrooms.

See posts on antiquesandartireland.com for May 29, May 28, May 27, May 20, May 19 and March 29.

KEATING SCENES FROM SYNGE’S PLAYBOY AT WHYTES

Saturday, May 28th, 2011

Sean Keating's illustration for The Playboy of the Western World at Whyte's. UPDATE: THIS MADE 41,000

These illustrations from April 1922 are from five oils by Sean Keating PRHA HRA HRSA (1889-1977) of  scenes from J.M. Synge’s The Playboy of the Western World.  The images feature as lots 33 to 37 in Whyte’s sale of Irish Art in Dublin on May 30.  They feature models of contemporary Irish actors and actresses.
The artist makes an appearance in the images as Christy Mahon’s father. Keating even posed nude in the image of lot number 37.

This Sean Keating illustration is estimated at 15,000-20,000. UPDATE: THIS WAS UNSOLD.

An important commission for the artist, they formed part of his own collection.  He exhibited in them in various venues in the late 1920′s.  They were published by George Allen and Unwin, London, in 1927.
Lot 33 (illustrated on the left), estimated at 30,000-40,000,  featured on a commemorative stamp issued by An Post in 2009 to mark the centenary of the death of Synge.  The five works are variously estimated at between 15,000 and 40,000.
UPDATE:  Only one of these five oils sold. The auction grossed over 700,000 with a sell rate of 73%.

See post on antiquesandartireland.com for May 19.

FROM HENRY TO HENDRIX AT WHYTE’S IRISH ART

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Paul Henry RHA (1876-1958) Cottage and Wheat Stacks at Whyte's. It is estimated at 60,000-80,000. (Click on image to enlarge) UPDATE: THIS MADE 106,000.

Maurice MacGonigal PRHA HRA HRSA (1900-1979) THE RIVER DODDER NEAR TEMPLEOGUE, estimate 2,000-3,000. Click on image to enlarge. UPDATE: THIS MADE 1,900

From west of Ireland landscapes by Paul Henry to Jimmy Hendrix in concert by renowned photographer John Minihane the Whytes sale on May 30 promises something for everyone.

The venue for this 300 lot Irish art sale is the Clyde Rooms at the Royal Dublin Society.

It Includes a unique archive of material from Jack B Yeats’ studio. There are watercolours by  Yeats, a wonderful Paul Henry from the 1920′s, Sean Keating original paintings for Synge’s Playboy of The Western World, rare early works by Miceal MacLiammoir, and a great selection of contemporary works. Whytes say that all estimates are realistic and range from 200 to 80,000.

UPDATE: The sale grossed over 700,000 and achieved a 73 per cent sell through rate.  The Yeats archive made 24,000.

AT THE ISLE OF WIGHT, 1969 Estimate: €500-700. (click to enlarge)”]

John Minihan (b.1946) JIMI HENDRIX UPDATE: THIS WAS UNSOLD

John Minihan (b.1946) RAY CHARLES IN CONCERT WATERFORD, 1993 Estimate: €500-700. (click on image to enlarge). UPDATE: THIS WAS UNSOLD

Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974) PORTRAIT OF DESMOND McCARTHY, 1936 Estimate: €1500-1800. UPDATE: THIS WAS UNSOLD

TWO IRISH PROCLAMATIONS SEPARATED BY 113 YEARS

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

Robert Emmet's 1803 Proclamation. (click to enlarge)

Lot 41 at Whyte’s History, Literature and Collectibles sale in Dublin  on Saturday, April 16 is Robert Emmet’s Proclamation of 1803.  Allegedly 10,000 were printed but it was dangerous to be in possession of one, so most were destroyed.  This is one of only three known examples in private hands.  It begins:   “The Provisional Government TO THE PEOPLE OF IRELAND” and is estimated to make 30,000-50,000.  This is a sale of 628 lots.

SEE antiquesandartireland.com post for April 8.

UPDATE:  This Proclamation made 25,000 in a sale that grossed over 300,000 with a selling rate of 70 per cent.

The 1916 Proclamation at Adams-Mealy's. (click to enlarge)

Lot 527 at Adams Mealy’s Independence sale in Dublin on Tuesday, April 19 is this 1916 Proclamation. There are thought to be no more than 50 surviving copies, many in public collections. This one is estimated at €100,000-150,000.  There are 631 lots in total in this sale.

IN AN AUCTION WHICH REALISED 655,000 AT HAMMER THIS LOT FAILED TO SELL.

WHAT PRICE GIANT’S CAUSEWAY BASALT STONES?

Friday, April 8th, 2011

A collection of four hexagonal basalt column sections similar to those found at Ireland’s famed Giants Causeway is the first of 628 lots at Whyte’s History, Literature and Collectibles sale in Dublin on April 16.   They have been in the garden of a County Donegal home for at least fifty years. Whyte’s said it is possible they were acquired from Kennedy Quarries, Portrush, Co. Antrim  in the vicinity of land now belonging to the National Trust. Similar examples were auctioned at Summers Place Auctions in association with Sotheby’s on 19 October 2010 (lot 132) and realised £18,500.

The Giant’s Causeway is the most popular tourist attraction in Northern Ireland. The unusual stone landscape was formed around 50 to 60 million years ago  when Antrim was subject to intense volcanic activity. Rapidly cooling molten basalt formed an extensive lava plateau in columns. Legend has it that the Irish warrior Fionn mac Cumhaill (Finn McCool) built the causeway to walk to Scotland to fight his Scottish counterpart Benandonner.

Examples of these stones in private collections are extremely rare. The Causeway area has been National Trust property for many years. It is illegal to remove anything from the site.  These ones are estimated at 3,000-4,000.

UPDATE: They sold for 2,000.

EMIGRATION THEME OF JAMES BRENAN WORK AT WHYTE’S

Saturday, March 5th, 2011

The Finishing Touch by James Brenan. (click on image to enlarge) UPDATE; IT MADE 22,000

James Brenan RHA (1837-1907) was headmaster at the School of Art in Cork. Emigration – one again a timely issue in recession torn Ireland – was a subject that captured his imagination in the 19th century. It is the theme of this 1876 work in a farmhouse setting.
Entitled The Finishing Touch, it tells the story of a young woman on the eve of her departure for America. Her father takes centre stage. The title refers not only to his hand on the emigrant’s box, but also to the painter completing work on the green box on which the words O’Connor, New York can be deciphered.
This picture was exhibited in the year it was painted at the Royal Hibernian Academy. It features at Whyte’s Irish and British art sale at the RDS in Dublin on March 14.  The work is estimated at 15,000-20,000.
UPDATE  IT SOLD FOR 22,000

GEORGE CAMPBELL AT WHYTE’S IRISH ART SALE

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011
Woman and Bag is the title of this work by George Campbell.  It comes under the hammer at Whyte’s Irish art sale in Dublin on March 14 at 6 p.m. The sale includes a Waterford collection put together from the 1950′s to the 1970′s.  These will comprise the first 40 lots of this 290 lots sale.
The range of Irish art on offer is broad and estimates are realistic  The catalogue is now on-line and on-line bidding is also available.
See antiquesandartireland.com posts for February 23 and January 27.
UPDATE:  IT SOLD FOR 10,500