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  • Posts Tagged ‘National Gallery of Ireland’

    A LARGE ASSEMBLY OF VERMEERS AT IRELAND’S NATIONAL GALLERY

    Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

    Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting at the newly refurbished National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin until September 17 includes as many as ten works by the artist. This represents almost one third of the surviving oeuvre of Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675).  It is the third highest number of works by the artist ever assembled in the world.

    The National Gallery of Ireland’s Vermeer, Lady Writing a Letter with Her Maid, c.1670, which is regarded as one of the artist’s finest works, will be shown alongside other exquisite works including Woman with a Balance, c.1663–4 (National Gallery of Art, Washington); Woman with a Pearl Necklace, 1663-4 (Staatliche Museen zu Berlin); The Astronomer, 1668 (Musée du Louvre, Paris) and The Geographer, 1669 (Städel Museum, Frankfurt-am-Main). Paintings of daily life by contemporaries of Vermeer, including Gerrit Dou, Gerard ter Borch, Jan Steen, Gabriel Metsu, Pieter de Hooch and Frans van Mieris, will also feature.  The show brings together some 60 paintings from around the world.

    It is organised by the National Gallery of Ireland in collaboration with the Musée du Louvre, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington. An illustrated catalogue (published by Yale University Press) will accompany the exhibition.

    Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675)
    Woman Writing a Letter with Her Maid, c.1670
    Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675) Woman with a Balance, c. 1663–4
    Widener Collection. Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington

     

    AN IMAGE OF ST. PATRICK BY MARGARET CLARKE

    Friday, March 17th, 2017

    Margaret Clarke – St. Patrick with a group of figures and an Irish wolfhound. © The Artist’s Estate

    This image of St. Patrick with a group of figures and an Irish Wolfhound by Margaret Clarke RHA (1888-1961) is in the collection of the National Gallery of Ireland.  The watercolour, gouache, charcoal and graphite on paper work was purchased in 2007.

    Newry born Margaret Clarke (nee Crilley) studied at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art under William Orpen after winning a scholarship in 1905.  After completing her studies she began working as assistant to Orpen and exhibited at the Royal Hibernian Academy from 1913 until 1953. Most of the work she exhibited was portraits. In 1914 Margaret married her fellow student Harry Clarke.  They had three children.  Margaret became the director of the Harry Clarke Stained Glass Studios following the death of her husband in 1931. Her work is in the National Gallery, the Hugh Lane, the Crawford in Cork, the Ulster Museum, Limerick City Gallery, the National Self Portrait Collection and the Irish College in Rome.

    We wish all our readers a happy St. Patrick’s Day.

    CARAVAGGIO OPENS AT NATIONAL GALLERY OF IRELAND

    Saturday, February 11th, 2017
    The first of two of this years highly anticipated exhibitions at the National Gallery of Ireland – which amounts to an embarrassment of riches by Caravaggio and Vermeer – opens today in Dublin.   Beyond Caravaggio brings together over 40 works including four by Caravaggio as well as significant works by those artists he influenced. It runs from today until May 14.
    It will be followed in June by a show which will bring together 60 paintings from around the world, including no less than ten by Vermeer. This represents almost a third of his surviving oeuvre. Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry will include work by Gabriel Metsu, Jan Steen, Gerard ter Borch, Pieter de Hooch and Frans van Mieris.  Organised by the National Gallery in conjunction with the Louvre and the National Gallery of Art in Washington it will run from June 17 to September 17.

    Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) Boy bitten by a Lizard, 1594-5 The National Gallery, London © Copyright The National Gallery, London 2017

    Francesco Buoneri (or Boneri) called Cecco del Caravaggio (c.1589–after 1620) A Musician, c.1615 The Wellington Collection, Apsley House (English Heritage)
    Photo: Apsley House, London © Historic England

    SHOW OF WORKS BY CARAVAGGIO NOT SEEN IN IRELAND BEFORE

    Saturday, January 7th, 2017
    Never before seen in Ireland works by Caravaggio will feature at an upcoming exhibition at the National Gallery in Dublin   Beyond Caravaggio, which runs from February 11 to May 14, will feature two works by the artist which have not been seen here before – Boy Bitten by a Lizard from the collection of the National Gallery in London and Boy Peeling Fruit from the Royal Collection in the UK.  The other works by the artist in the show are The Supper at Emmaus from the National Gallery in London and The Taking of Christ from the collection of Ireland’s National Gallery.
    With his dramatic use of light and uncompromising realism Caravaggio is acknowledged as bringing a revolution to painting during the Baroque period. This exhibition features over 40 works which show how he influenced other artists. These include Valentin de Boulogne’s Concert with Three Figures, Georges de La Tour’s Dice Players and Nicolas Regnier’s St. Sebastian being tended by St. Irene.  Many works in this show –  a collaboration between the National Galleries of Ireland, London and Scotland – are on loan from private collections and regional galleries.

    Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) – Boy Peeling Fruit.

    Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) – Boy Bitten by a Lizard.

    ANNUAL EXHIBITION OF TURNER WATERCOLOURS AT NATIONAL GALLERY OF IRELAND

    Sunday, January 1st, 2017
    JMW Turner (1775-1851) Sunset over Petworth Park, Sussex, c.1828 Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    JMW Turner (1775-1851)
    Sunset over Petworth Park, Sussex, c.1828
    Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    The annual exhibition of works by Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) displayed for the month of January at the National Gallery of Ireland gets underway today. For over a century the Gallery has followed the stipulations set out by the art collector Henry Vaughan in a bequest; that 31 watercolours covering the entire career of one of the great masters of British painting were to be exhibited to the public all at one time, free of charge, during the month of January. This is the month when daylight is low and at its least damaging level.

    Inspired by the writings of John Ruskin the collector Henry Vaughan (1809-1899) decided to gift his collection of Turner watercolours to the National Galleries of Ireland, England and Scotland. This year, alongside the much loved Vaughan bequest, the National Gallery of Ireland will display a selection of Turner’s Liber Studiorum prints.  Turner embarked on his most important publishing venture the Liber Studiorum – or drawing book – in 1807.  The series of over 70 prints was conceived as a visual treatise on landscape and art and made his work accessible to a wide audience.  The show runs to January 31.

    IRISH HISTORY DISPLAYED IN ARTWORKS AT NATIONAL GALLERY

    Saturday, October 8th, 2016
    Every painting tells a story and Ireland’s history can be seen in pictures at a show opening at the National Gallery in Dublin today.  Creating History:  Stories of Ireland in Art is the gallery’s principal contribution to this Decade of Centenaries.  The 55 paintings on display date from the 17th to the 20th century and depict or were inspired by Irish history from the arrival of St. Patrick to the establishment of the Irish Free State.
    Arranged thematically with sections entitled Testimony, Conflict, Assembly, Allegory and Lamentation, the exhibition features paintings from the permanent collection as well as work on loan from public and private collections in Ireland and overseas.  Some, like William Turner De Lond’s George IV, King of England, entering Dublin, 1821 and Sir John Lavery’s The Ratification of the Irish Treaty in the English House of Lords, 1921, have been unseen in public for many years.  Others, like Jan Wyck’s The Battle of the Boyne and Joseph Patrick Haverty’s, The Monster Meeting at Clifden, c.1844. have undergone extensive restoration specifically for this exhibition.  Yet more, such as Francis Wheatley, Dublin Volunteers on College Green, 1779 and Edwin Hayes, The Emigrant Ship, 1853 will be familiar to regulars at the gallery.  The exhibition, which is accompanied by a book with essays by Mary Jane Boland, Tom Dunne, R.F. Foster, Róisín Kennedy, Ruth Kenny and Emily Mark-FitzGerald and Brendan Rooney, runs until January 15 next.

    The O’Connell Centenary Celebrations, 1875 by Charles Russell (1852–1910) © National Gallery of Irelan

    The O’Connell Centenary Celebrations, 1875 by Charles Russell (1852–1910)
    © National Gallery of Irelan

    The Monster Meeting at Clifden, 1844 by Joseph Patrick Havery (1794-1864)  © National Gallery of Irelan

    The Monster Meeting at Clifden, 1844 by Joseph Patrick Havery (1794-1864) © National Gallery of Irelan

    ECLECTIC IMAGES AT IRELAND’S NATIONAL GALLERY

    Saturday, August 13th, 2016

    An exhibition of recent print and drawing acquisitions opens today at the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin. Entitled Eclectic Images the first part of the exhibition shows a selection of some 60 prints and illustrated books from the Brian Lalor Collection, which charts the developments in printmaking through the centuries, from the early reproductive prints of Maerten van Heemskerk (1498-1574), to Christopher Le Brun’s (b.1951) mysterious Four Riders series of etchings. It explores themes such as the portrait in print; early twentieth-century printmaking; Biblical Palestine; and works inspired by Whistler.

    The second part of the display includes some of the most beautiful and unusual watercolours, drawings and prints acquired by the Gallery through purchase or gift since 2011. It features drawings by Fernand Lèger, Walter Osborne and Kyffin Williams, as well as prints by Berthe Morisot, Frank Brangwyn and Micheal Farrell. The generous donation of over 160 prints received from Brian Lalor in 2014 underlines how the national collection continues to benefit from the generosity of private donors. Eclectic Images runs until December 7.  Here is a sample:

    John Faulkner (1835-1894) Inniskea Isle, Achill Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    John Faulkner (1835-1894)
    Inniskea Isle, Achill
    Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    Charles Blair Leighton (1823-1855) Choosing the Wedding Gown, 1869 Presented, Brian Lalor, 2014 Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    Charles Blair Leighton (1823-1855)
    Choosing the Wedding Gown, 1869
    Presented, Brian Lalor, 2014
    Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    James Caldwall (1739-1819) Macbeth, Act I, Scene III, 1798 Presented, Brian Lalor, 2014 Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    James Caldwall (1739-1819)
    Macbeth, Act I, Scene III, 1798
    Presented, Brian Lalor, 2014
    Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677) Portrait of Mary Villiers, Duchess of Richmond and Lennox, c.1646 Presented, Brian Lalor, 2014 Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677)
    Portrait of Mary Villiers, Duchess of Richmond and Lennox, c.1646
    Presented, Brian Lalor, 2014
    Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    LEONARDO DA VINCI AT IRELAND’S NATIONAL GALLERY

    Monday, March 7th, 2016

    Ten drawings by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), on loan from the Royal Collection in Britain, will go on display at the National Gallery of Ireland from May 4 to July 17.  They have been selected to show the extraordinary scope of the artist’s interests, from painting and sculpture to engineering, zoology, botany, mapmaking and anatomy. His use of different media – pen and ink, red and black chalks, watercolour and metalpoint – is well represented.

    This is the only Irish venue for this touring exhibition organised by Royal Collection Trust and supported by Key Capital. The drawings are on show in Newcastle until April 24 and after Dublin they will tour to Nottingham and Swansea.  In May, the National Gallery will provide a public programme of free talks, tours and workshops themed around Leonardo da Vinci – Artist, Inventor, Renaissance Man. Online booking for free tickets will open mid-April through the Gallery’s website.

    Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519) Expressions of fury in horses, lions and a man Pen and ink Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016

    Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519)
    Expressions of fury in horses, lions and a man
    Pen and ink
    Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016

    Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519) A male nude c.1504-5 Red chalk Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016

    Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519)
    A male nude c.1504-5
    Red chalk
    Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016

     

    ANNUAL DISPLAY OF TURNER WATERCOLOURS

    Friday, January 1st, 2016
    Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) Great Yarmouth Harbour, Norfolk, c.1840 Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851)
    Great Yarmouth Harbour, Norfolk, c.1840
    Photo © National Gallery of Ireland

    It is January and the Turner watercolours are once again on annual display at the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin.  This is a yearly showing of the Vaughan Bequest of 31 watercolours by Turner.  These delicate works are displayed at a time of year when the natural light is at its lowest. A series of special events and talks devoted to Turner will take place at the Gallery this month.

    The National Gallery of Scotland in Edinburgh has its 38 works from the Vaughan Bequest on display this month too.  The works in both galleries were bequeathed by Henry Vaughan, a London art collector with a passion for Turner and a connoisseur’s eye for quality.

    A RESCUED RUBENS FOR IRELAND’S NATIONAL GALLERY?

    Wednesday, November 18th, 2015
    Sir Peter Paul Rubens – Portrait of a Bearded Man (£2-3 million) © Christie’s Images Limited 2015

    Sir Peter Paul Rubens – Portrait of a Bearded Man (£2-3 million) © Christie’s Images Limited 2015

    It looks as if the Rubens from Russborough and other artworks scheduled to auctioned at Christie’s last July have now been rescued for the relatively impecunious Irish state. Rubens Head of a Bearded Man was the main lot in a planned sale of works from Russborough in Co. Wicklow designed to raise funds to maintain the house and grounds.  It is reported that the businessman Denis O’Brien has bought the Rubens for more than two million euro, though he has refused to confirm this.

    The Russborough Foundation said the process of finding donors for the works is ongoing. Under the S1003 scheme designed to encourage donations to Irish cultural institutions a taxpayer can write off 80% of the purchase cost with a ceiling of six million in respect of any single year. It is also reported that businessman John Gallagher has paid just under one million for another one of the works, The Adoration of the Shepherds by Adriaen Van Ostade, with the intention that it goes on display at the National Gallery. The businessman Lochlann Quinn has already acquired A Village Kermesse near Antwerp by David Teniers the Younger from the Russborough collection for the National Gallery.  All the works had been in storage and had not been seen in public for many years.

    (See post on antiquesandartireland.com for May 1, 2015).