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    SLEEPER LOT MAKES 120,000 OVER ESTIMATE OF 500-800 AT JAMES ADAM

    Monday, April 10th, 2017

    ITALIAN SCHOOL (19TH CENTURY)
    Jesus Wearing the Crown of Thorns

    Jesus Wearing the Crown of Thorns, an oil on copper panel measuring just  34 cm by 24 cm made a hammer price of 120,000 at the James Adam interiors sale in Dublin yesterday. It had been estimated at 500-800.

    A number of bidders had registered to bid on the phone and on the internet for the lot.  Eventually there was a bidding battle for the work between two internet bidders, neither of whom had actually viewed the painting.

    The work came from an institution that was having a clear out. Auctioneer James O’Halloran said he spotted it in a corridor because of the fantastic frame in which it was contained.  It was labelled “Italian School” and 19th century.  Copper is notoriously difficult to date, and it is now assumed that the work is from the 17th century.  The artist remains unknown at this stage.

    The work aroused strong interest from Italy and it is now leaving Ireland.  It is what auctioneers describe as a “sleeper”, a lot where the bidding unexpectedly takes off once it opens. This 120,000 hammer price followed a five minute bidding battle.

    AN AT HOME SALE AT JAMES ADAM

    Friday, April 7th, 2017

    There will be an interiors At Home auction at James Adam in Dublin at noon on April 9.  The catalogue, which is online, lists 400 lots.  Here is a small selection:

    DUTCH SCHOOL (18TH CENTURY)
    Figures at a table in an interior with a basket of vegetables (500-800)  UPDATE: THIS MADE 600 AT HAMMER

    A FRENCH KINGWOOD AND LEATHER INSET SHAPED RECTANGULAR WRITING DESK (300-400)  UPDATE: THIS MADE 350 AT HAMMER

    A PAIR OF 19TH CENTURY SEVRES PORCELAIN URNS (800-1,200)  UPDATE: THESE MADE 650 AT HAMMER

    IRISH FIVE-PIECE SILVER TEA AND COFFEE SERVICE, Dublin 1966, mark of Larry Gunning (1,200-1,800)  UPDATE: THIS MADE 1,400 AT HAMMER

    A BONO SELF PORTRAIT SKETCH AT HEGARTY’S IN BANDON

    Friday, April 7th, 2017

    THE SELF PORTRAIT BY BONO.

    A Bono self portrait sketch comes up at Hegarty’s sale in Bandon next Sunday.  The sketch by the globally known lead singer with U2, songwriter, venture capitalist and philanthropist is situated in a most un rockstar like position on the catalogue between a tall glass cabinet with gilt wood decoration and a large chesterfield leather sofa.

    Lot 29 in a sale due to start at 4 p.m. is a pen sketch signed in the centre by Paul “Bono” Hewson.  It measures 17″ x 13.75″ approximately.

    Dated 2007, it comes complete with a certificate of authenticity.  More than 300 lots will come under the hammer.

    (See post on antiquesandartireland.com for April 2, 2017)

    UPDATE: THIS MADE 380 AT HAMMER

    SOTHEBY’S HONG KONG SPRING SALES TOTAL OVER $400 MILLION

    Thursday, April 6th, 2017

    The Macallan in Lalique legacy collection

    The series of Spring sales at Sotheby’s in Hong Kong this week totalled US$406.1 million.  This is equivalent to the strong sales results recorded last year. Sotheby’s cel Tad Smith said: “Outstanding results in our traditional categories of Chinese ceramics and painting were joined by records across a range of collecting fields including western contemporary art and jewellery”.

    With increased participation from mainland China and buoyant demand from collectors in Asia and the west the series established records for the Pink Star diamond, the Xuande fish bowl, a piece of western Contemporary art sold in Asia, a record per carat price for a fancy intense blue diamond and a record for any whiskey lot ever sold at auction with The Macallan in Lalique which sold for US$989,423.  There was increased online purchase with an 80% increase in lots over HK$41 million sold online.

    (See posts on antiquesandartireland.com for April 4, April 3 and March 29)

    THE MOST EXPENSIVE PAINTING SOLD SO FAR IN IRELAND THIS YEAR

    Wednesday, April 5th, 2017

    Still Life by William Scott (1913-1989)

    A 1973 Still Life by William Scott made a hammer price of 140,000 at de Veres sale in Dublin last night to become the most expensive painting sold in Ireland so this year. Chased by at least six bidders it was bought by an Irish private collector who lives abroad.  Though this was the most successful Spring art sale at de Veres for the past ten years, bringing over a million euro, Rory Guthrie commented that the art market in Ireland remains unpredictable.

    The good news is that this 160 lot auction aroused a lot of interest, particularly in the Irish collection of the late Michael Carroll of AIB.  A private collection like this always creates interest and all but two of the 75 lots in this part of the auction sold, mostly for above estimate. A close friend of  artists Tony O’Malley and Cecil King, Michael Carroll bought many of his works from the Dawson Gallery and latterly the Taylor Galleries.

    From the Woods Shadow by Jack B. Yeats made a hammer price of 82,000, Muingingaun (Maiden Stream) by Hughie O’Donoghue made 35,000, Jack’s House (Pink) and Jack’s House (Blue) by Basil Blackshaw made hammer prices respectively of 27,000 and 25,000, Eden, a tapestry by Louis le Brocquy made 24,000 and Connemara Mare by Patrick Hennessy sold for 16,000.  Tranquility by Kenneth Webb made 13,000 at hammer, Sawers Belfast by Hector McDonnell made 8,000, Head of a Traveller by Blackshaw made 15,000, Figures Connemara by Charles Lamb sold for 15,000, Spring Rooks by Tony O’Malley made 16,000, West Cork Waterfall by William Crozier made 8,000, Isobel by Daniel O’Neill made 15,500, Thinking of the South (France) by Camille Souter made 13,000, La Maternite by Evie Hone made 10,000, Interior by Tony O’Malley made 11,000 and Harbour Scene by Patrick Collins made 16,000.

    (See post on antiquesandartireland.com for March 16, 2017)

    A GUINNESS FAMILY GUARDI FOR £25 MILLION

    Wednesday, April 5th, 2017

    FRANCESCO GUARDI (Venice 1712–1793), The Rialto Bridge with the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi.

    A painting by Francesco Guardi handed down through generations of the Guinness family will lead Christie’s Classic Week Old Masters evening sale in London on July 6.  The Rialto Bridge with the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi is being sold for only the second time since it was painted in the mid 1760’s.  It is expected to make around £25 million.

    It is one of a pair of Venetian views by Guardi, one looking north and the other south, first acquired in 1768, probably from the artist, by a young English grand tourist called Chaloner Arcedeckne. Both paintings stayed in his family until 1891 when they were sold privately for £3,850 to Edward Cecil Guinness, the chief executive and then chairman of the brewing company.  He was the first Earl of Iveagh.  The two Guardi’s were kept by the Guinness’s and hung at Pyrford Court in Surrey.  They were separated in 2011 when Rialto Bridge from the Fondamenta del Carbon, was sold to an anonymous bidder at Sotheby’s for £26.7m–a record for a Venetian view painting. A temporary export bar failed to keep the work in the UK.

    Henry Pettifer, Head of Christie’s Old Master Paintings EMERI said: “This majestic view of Venice is one of the great masterpieces of eighteenth-century view painting. Painted in the mid-1760s, at the height of the artist’s career, this is a monumental tour de force displaying the full range of Guardi’s technical virtuosity and his unique ability to capture the atmosphere and sensuous experience of being in Venice. After the record-breaking Old Master sales at Christie’s in 2016, with the Rubens Lot and his Daughters and the pair of Rembrandt portraits sold by private treaty, we are confident this great Guardi will arouse enormous interest from global collectors of masterpieces, from Old Masters to Contemporary, this July.”

    The Rialto Bridge with the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi will be shown at Classic Week in New York from April 22-26 before returning to Venice for the first time for an exhibition at the Aman Hotel (May 8-15) to coincide with the Venice Biennale. It will then travel to Hong Kong for exhibition from May 26-29 before returning to London.

    ONE OF TURNER’S GREATEST WORKS AT SOTHEBY’S IN JULY

    Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

    J.M.W. Turner (1775-1881) – Ehrenbreitstein

    One of the greatest works by J.M.W. Turner still in private hands comes up at Sotheby’s in July. Ehrenbreitstein is the most important oil of a German subject that Turner ever painted.  It depicts the ruined fortress of Ehrenbreitstein near Coblenz – a place of special significance for the artist. Painted in 1835  this late work is from a period widely considered Turner’s best.  Other works from this time now hang in the world’s greatest museums, with only a minute number of this importance and quality remaining in private ownership. The subject of enormous critical acclaim when it was first exhibited in 1835.  It comes up in London on July 5 with an estimate of £15-25 million.

    Major works of such quality by Turner are rare on the international market. The last example to be offered (Rome, from Mount Aventine, painted in the same year as Ehrenbreitstein and offered at Sotheby’s in 2014) made a record £30.3 million.  This was the highest price achieved for any British-born artist at auction, and placed Turner alongside Rubens and Raphael as one of just three artists from the pre-Impressionist era to have achieved prices at this level.

    Alex Bell, Co-Chairman of Sotheby’s International Old Masters Department, said: “This painting was one of five that Turner exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1835; the other four of which are now in some of the most distinguished institutions in the world. Of those five paintings, it was Ehrenbreitstein that caught the imagination of public and critics alike – and it’s easy to see why. Its extraordinary range and depth of colour, and typically inspired and imaginative use of light, would in any case mark this painting out as a masterpiece, but its true greatness lies in the way Turner applies his painterly genius to transform the ruins of the famous fortress into a poetic and symbolic image as resonant then as it is today.“

    Of the other four paintings exhibited by Turner in that year one is in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, one is at the Metropolitan Museum in New York, one is at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and one is in the Cleveland Museum of Art in Ohio.

    (See post on antiquesandartireland.com for September 8, 2014)

    A RECORD FOR WESTERN ART AT SOTHEBY’S HONG KONG

    Monday, April 3rd, 2017

    The scene at Sotheby’s in Hong Kong.

    There was a record for a piece of western contemporary art sold at auction in Asia when Andy Warhol’s Mao made US$12.6 million at Sotheby’s in Hong Kong.  It was bought by an Asian collector.  The Mao series marked a significant stylistic turning point for Warhol in the 1970’s. Mao was created in 1973, a year after the crucial moment of global politics where President Nixon visited China and Chairman Mao. Warhol’s portraits of Mao are undeniably among the most influential and enduring of all his images. The work is one of a series of 22 paintings, and four of them are in renowned public collections.

    The painting in red and gold carries the highly expressionistic and flamboyant handling of paint as well as the artist’s resolution and confidence.  Mao was transformed into the newest player on the fashion circuit and a glamourised member of the 1970’s pop idols.

    The Modern and Contemporary Art evening sale totalled US$73.6 million.

    CONTENTS FROM HOME OF DEPARTED AIB CHIEF AT BANDON SALE

    Sunday, April 2nd, 2017
    Contents from Glebe House, Lisheen, Skibbereen, Co. Cork – former home of departed AIB chief David Duffy – will feature at Hegarty’s sale in Bandon on April 9.
    Prime lots include a Killarney wood tip up centre table inlaid with a view of Muckross Abbey and decorated with shamrock and other local views. It is estimated at 10,000-20,000.

    There is an Irish Regency fold over card table (2,500-3,500), an Edwardian walnut and ebonised credenza (1,000-2,000), a Cork Regency Nelson sideboard (300-500), a French  gilt wood pier mirror (1,500-2,500) and a pair of Art Deco style aviation armchairs (1,200-1,800). Among the artists who feature are Arthur Maderson, Peter Copperwhite, Markey Robinson and Marie Carroll and collectibles include a snuff bottle and a bronze 19th century Tibetan figure. Around 300 lots will come under the hammer.

    A tip up Killarney wood centre table (10,000-20,000)  UPDATE: THIS MADE 11,000 AT HAMMER.

    A Regency fold over card table (2,500-3,500). UPDATE: THIS MADE 2,150 AT HAMMER. 

     

     

    JACKIE KENNEDY’S LETTERS TO LORD HARLECH MAKE £100,000

    Thursday, March 30th, 2017

    Personal letters from Jackie Kennedy made £100,000 at Bonhams sale of  The Contents of Glyn Cywarch – The Property of Lord Harlech in London.  The Kennedy-Harlech Papers  the heartfelt personal letters between Jackie Kennedy and David Ormsby Gore, Lord Harlech, sold in the room to a private buyer.  This was a white glove sale where every one of the 531 lots sold. The sale total was £2,599,038, more than two and a half times the pre-sale estimate.

    The collection included Mrs. Kennedy’s rejection letter to the 5th Baron Harlech, one of JFK’s most intimate confidantes.  He was British Ambassador to the US from 1961 to 1965 and he and JFK had been friends since their student days at the LSE.  The 18 letters reveal that when he asked her to marry him she responded that she saw him ‘like a brother’. They remained friends until his death in 1985. She penned the rejection letter five years after JFK’s death as she sailed on the yacht of Aristotle Onassis, the shipping magnate who became her second husband. Lord Harlech had recently lost his wife Sissy in a car crash and was said to have proposed to Jackie while they were on holiday together in February 1968.

    Other highlights included a newly discovered portrait by Marcus Gheeraerts, court painter to Elizabeth I. It sold for £269,000 against an estimate of £60,000-80,000. Painted in 1597 it portrays Ellen Maurice, a prominent Welsh heiress and Harlech ancestor, whose pearls and jewellery are worth the equivalent of one million pounds in today’s market. Two remarkable Elizabeth I joined oak three-tier buffets, circa 1580-1600, made £140,500 against an estimate of £35,000-45,000. A 1936 Rapier 10Hp Tourer, a rare British sports car, one of only 300 built sold for £31,500.  And Irish artist Daniel Quigley’s portrait of The Godolphin Arabian, one of three Eastern stallions from which all modern racehorses descend, made over five times its estimate, selling for £100,000.  The auction was to raise funds for the restoration of Glyn Cywarch (known as Glyn) which Jasset, 7th Lord Harlech inherited on the death of his father in February 2016.

    (See post on antiquesandartireland.com for Febraury 26, 2017)

    The Kennedy-Harlech Papers sold for £100,000.

    Marcus Gheeraerts. This Portrait of Ellen Maurice made £269,000. Her pearls and jewellery would be worth £1 million in today’s market.